Author: ¡disruptisms!

¡disruptisms! is a blog dedicated to disrupting colonization, racism, heterosexism, sexism, cissexism, & other interlocking systems of oppression in politics, pop culture, & elsewhere. We offer decolonized intersectionality for the soul.

Movimiento Mondays: Posts To Read This Morning 7/6/15

Why is Washington Saying Very Little About Puerto Rico

Whether it is by choice or necessity, the Puerto Rican diaspora is growing at an unprecedented rate.  Migration is fraying the socioeconomic fabric of the island. It is upsetting to all Puerto Ricans, particularly those who grew up in its heyday. But as the diaspora grows so does the island’s power. It is up to Boricuas to choose how to use it.

Read more at Latino Rebels


The Political Discourses of Black Indigeneity, and Why it Matters

As is our custom, we began to debate politics, popular culture, and just straight shit talking. Our conversations ranged from whether Beyonce can be a feminist, to how someone could support racist mascots. Then, we started to debate current happenings in the D (Detroit!). The bulk of our discussion was centered on how hipsters⎯white hipsters⎯are moving into Detroit, and setting up businesses downtown. One of my friends called it gentrification, the other homie chimed in and made a distinction between urban renewal, which is what is happening downtown, and gentrification, which is happening all over the city. I was pretty quiet, after all, I’m a historian, what do I know about contemporary politics?

Read more at Native Appropriations


IMAGES: CHICANO-CON AND THE SAN DIEGO YOU WON’T SEE AT COMIC-CON

While San Diego Comic-Con has become linked with the city’s economy, it’s worth pointing out that one reason other cities probably feel they have a shot at wresting it from San Diego’s grasp is, there’s very little inside the event that actually reflects the city.

Over the weekend, the Chicano-Con exhibit began putting more of the “San Diego” back into this sphere. The event, a pair of two-day art exhibitions inside Barrio Logan, a neighborhood less than a mile from the convention’s high-rent district that formed its identity in the early 1900s with the infusion of refugees from the Mexican Revolution.

Read more at Racialicious


 

In Mexico with Frida Kahlo

Frida is an artist of the post-modern world.  She painted about the parts of us that the homogenizing force of modernism and industry attempted to deny.  She illustrated the belittled world of feelings – the struggle to see ourselves as whole, beautiful, precious, especially because of our differences and imperfections.  She painted the world as herself – in fragments.  In the course of doing so, she turned herself, uni-brow, mustache and all, into an icon of beauty, cultural pride, and the unsinkable, inextinguishable, undefinable stuff of which we are made.

Read more at Race Files

 

Billboard: Kendrick Lamar Responds to Geraldo Rivera – ‘Hip Hop Is Not the Problem, Our Reality Is’

Kendrick Lamar: “Hip-hop is not the problem. Our reality is the problem of the situation. This is our music. This is us expressing ourselves. Rather [than] going out here and doing the murders myself, I want to express myself in a positive light the same way other artists are doing. Not going out in the streets, go in the booth and talking about the situation and hoping these kids can find some type of influence on it in a positive manner. Coming from these streets and coming from these neighborhoods, we’re taking our talents and putting ‘em inside the studio.”

Read More

“Skirting the Issue”: a response & call to action

Moontime Warrior

I submitted a shorter version of this op-ed to the Winnipeg Free Press on June 17, 2015, in response to Professor Joanne Boucher’s opinion piece entitled “Dress-code message at U of W sexist”.

After this, the WFP published a response, “Pipe ceremony dress code uncalled for”, where Prof. Boucher was quoted once more, along with four men (any one of whom could’ve redirected media attention to an Indigenous woman). The voices of Indigenous women and Two-Spirits excluded on an issue that at its core impacts our bodies and our lives. We are the ones who face the consequences of these discussions, along with the backlash.

Finally, rather than choosing to publish anything submitted by Indigenous women (or any of the many Indigenous women academics who speak publicly on ceremony and protocol), the Winnipeg Free Press published an editorial calling the whole thing a result of “identity politics”. The issue of…

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Trans women may now be held in women’s facilities, immigration officials say

Fusion

U.S. immigration officials on Monday announced transgender detainees will for the first time be able to be housed in detention facilities that match their gender identity.

The update is part of an 18-page guide unveiled today that details how U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers and contractors should interact with transgender immigrants in custody.

“We believe this guidance is the most comprehensive for transgender individuals in any custodial entity,”  Andrew Lorenzen-Strait, the deputy assistant director for custody programs for ICE, told Fusion in a telephone interview Monday.

The announcement comes less than a week after an undocumented transgender woman named Jennicet Gutiérrez interrupted President Obama’s speech at a White House pride event.

“President Obama, release all LGBTQ immigrants from detention,” Gutiérrez told the president.

Also last week 35 members of the House of Representatives sent a letter to Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson urging him to end the…

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MIC.COM: “17 Photos Reveal Why LGBTQ People of Color of Are #NotTooProudToFight During Pride Month”

Darnell L. Moore’s  piece on LGBTQ people of color is definitely worth a read:

“If LGBTQ people have reason to be proud today, it is because of the radical responses of the tenacious freedom fighters, black and brown folk among them, who refused to be mistreated and shamed by the state or society. Yet contemporary Pride celebrations often overlook the radical starting place of the queer and trans struggle. These events also tend to be largely organized around white LGBTQ people.

Given this reality, Mic asked LGBTQ people of color to tell us who they are thinking about and fighting for during this Pride season. The hashtag adorning each photo, #NotTooProudToFight, is meant to reframe the common understanding of LGBTQ Pride month from a moment only of celebration to one committed to the fight for racial, gender, social and economic justice.”

TARANTINO’S LENS: “Revenge Is A Dish Best Served By White-Male Privilege/Why Didn’t The Oppressed Do It My Way”

The “clown-ification “of systemic oppression/repression presented by Tarantino creates a sense that these “foolish” people could be overthrown as easily as portrayed within Tarantino’s 120-minute(ish) films. So audience members walk-out of theaters feeling cleansed of anti-black racism, white supremacy, and anti-Semitism. They have their “what if” conversations, praising Tarantino on another “cinematic masterpiece” all the while digesting the liberatory vision of a white-male bent on exploiting communities that have experienced historical oppression. Rinse. Repeat. And all is right in the world.

Only all is clearly not right in the world.

Read the rest at Pinnland Empire

Rape Culture: From Grimdark Fantasy to Reality

thenerdsofcolor

Trigger Warning: Sexual Assault and Rape Survivors

When I worked as a reporter for a local paper in East Tennessee some years back, a story arose about a young woman who had been sexually assaulted at her high school. When the issue was brought to the school board’s attention, they moved heaven and earth to shame the young woman and to vilify her and her family.

No one denied the attack happened but nothing was done about it because the attacker was a star athlete and the school’s administration was beyond corrupt. When I tried to follow up and get the family’s side of events, the story was buried due to local politics and my publisher’s wish to stay in good with the Powers That Be in the county.

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An Open Letter to J.K. Rowling about the American Wizarding School in Fantastic Beasts

thenerdsofcolor

by Dr. Adrienne Keene | Originally posted at Native Appropriations

Dear J.K. Rowling,

I am unabashedly a huge Harry Potter fan. I first encountered Harry when I was in Junior High, volunteering at the public library (nerd status, I know). The children’s librarian handed me book one, and I was hooked. I even used to frequent Harry Potter message boards back in the day with my friend Kathleen (we were “Parvati” and “Lavender” cause we also shared an interest in divination, ha). Anyway, all this is to say, Harry holds a sacred spot in my heart. But I’m not one of those fans who can recite things verbatim, or remember every tiny detail, so if I’m missing something, I hope one of those fans will help me out.

I’ve been interestedly following the news that there is a new Harry Potter prequel-of-sorts in the works, for Fantastic Beasts and Where…

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Sense8 and the Failure of Global Imagination

thenerdsofcolor

How do you imagine a life you could never live? Though not really a theme, this problem is at the heart of Netflix’s new original series Sense8, created by the Wachowskis and J. Michael Straczynski, and heavily influenced by Tom Tykwer. Like many fantastical or science fictional premises, Sense8’s premise is a wish fulfillment: not — as is typical of this genre and the Wachowski’s earlier work — the wish fulfillment of the disempowered middle school nerd stuffed into a locker, but rather the Mary Sue desire of a mature, white American writer/auteur who has discovered that an entire world is “out there,” one that the maker doesn’t know how to imagine.

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